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Cover: Shaken and stirred

Recipes with lemon

20Sep 12

Lemon Cranberry Splash

Lemon Cranberry Splash

Pucker up for this lemon cranberry splash cocktail! Unlike most of the cocktails I write about, this tipple I concoted myself. Well, that’s not to say that others don’t do the exact same thing, but in my travels, I have never seen one exactly like it.

The lemon and cranberry flavours seem to blend together, but there is a bit of a sour aftertaste. That’s why I usually like to rim my glass with sugar to offset the tart flavour of the fruit.

For the lemony flavour, I like to make my home-made lemonade. It takes a bit longer to prepare, but I prefer natural ingredients as opposed to the shop-bought version. However, I have been thinking about having a go at combining limoncello with a bit of cranberry juice to substitute for the lemonade. Using both limoncello and vodka will make the cocktail as a whole a bit stronger, though. So if you are considered a lightweight drinker, you could probably just take out the vodka all together.

As I said before, this is really just playing around with flavours. And in all honesty, I believe this is still a work in progress. I don’t believe I have quite perfected the recipe yet, so if you have any ideas, leave a comment and let me know!

A food complement to this cocktail might be these lemon and sesame chicken breasts.

Lemon Cranberry Splash
Author: 
Recipe type: Cocktail
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 1
 
A work-in-progress tart cocktail
Ingredients
  • 8cl freshly-squeezed lemon juice
  • 6cl water
  • 5g sugar
  • 1 lemon peel swirl
  • 5cl vodka
  • 2cl cranberry juice
  • 2 cranberries
  • ice
Instructions
  1. Squeeze the lemon juice into a large pitcher.
  2. Stir in the sugar until it completely dissolves.
  3. Add the water and the splash of cranberry juice, stirring all the while.
  4. When mixed together, pour the cranberry lemonade into a cocktail shaker with the vodka and ice.
  5. Meanwhile, use a slice of lemon to moisten the rim of your martini glass.
  6. Dip it in sugar so that it is completely covered.
  7. Shake the ingredients in the cocktail shaker until condensation forms on the outside of the glass.
  8. Pour into the martini glass and garnish with a lemon swirl and the cranberries.

 

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22Jul 12

The Tornado, a Caribbean classic

TornadoLast Easter, a couple of friends decided to go to the Caribbean for a few days, so I tagged along. We went to the Dominican Republic. As soon as we arrived at the hotel in Santo Domingo, we were greeted by their wonderful staff with a drink I had never heard of before, but which has become a favourite both in flavour and memories: the tornado.

The Dominican Republic turned out to be a vibrant, hectic and incredibly invigorating experience. We spent quite a lot of our time wandering the streets of the capital and became fixated by its people. The stories we heard mostly involved two topics: merengue and tornado cocktails. Merengue is a type of music and dance from the Dominican Republic. It was created by Nico Lora in the 1920s. There is a saying in the country which goes: “It does not matter if you are rich or poor, it is all about the rhythm in your hips.” And believe me, the people there can dance!

The tornado is a classic in local bars and dances. It is both a straight drink and a cocktail. The cocktail version is a little milder than the original one, but still has a punch. The main ingredient in it is dark rum, which is not surprising as it is the most important beverage Central America produces. It has a sweet and pleasant taste, and you can sip tornados endlessly on a warm summer evening, especially in the Caribbean.

One piece of advice: Be sure to shake this drink well to ensure the egg white mixes with the other ingredients. It is called tornado for a reason! (Another drink that uses egg white is the pisco sour. I definitely recommend it!)

The trip turned out to be a success, and I have since become a fan of both meringue music and tornado cocktails. The Dominican Republic is a place where I certainly want to return in the near future.

The tornado, a Caribbean classic
Author: 
Recipe type: Cocktail
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 1
 
The tornado is a classic in local bars and dances. It is both a straight drink and a cocktail
Ingredients
  • 2.5cl dark rum
  • 1.5cl light rum
  • 1 egg white
  • Dash of lemon juice
  • Dash of passion fruit juice
Instructions
  1. Pour the ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice cubes.
  2. Shake for no less than 1 minute.
  3. Strain into a chilled glass.

 

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28Jun 12

The real story behind the first daiquiri

DaiquiriCuba, for some reason, has always been a source of inspiration for the invention of drinks. There are many stories about bars like La Bodeguita del Medio, where Ernest Hemingway used to drink, and the history of sugar cane is attatched to the history of rum as much as it is to the history of the country. Today, I want to tell you about a very well-known cocktail, which can be mixed with a number of fruits and is a classic in Cuba and worldwide: the daiquiri.

On the 20th June, 1898, American troops landed in Cuba to get involved in the Hispanic-Cuban-American war. They chose two beaches to do so: Siboney and Daiquiri, the latter near Santiago de Cuba in the south of the country. The American soldiers were wearing winter uniforms when they set out on their campaign, and dehydration became a huge problem. When they joined the Cuban forces, though, they were saved by a refreshing drink that the local soldiers served them: “La canchánchara”, a mix of rum, water, lemon and honey.

Many years after that event, Emilio Gonzalez (also know as “Maragoto”), a Spanish bartender, took that formula and turned it into a fancy cocktail served at the Plaza Hotel in La Habana. After that, it was inmortalized by Constantino Ribalaigua, “El Gran Constante”, at La Floridita, another famous bar in the Cuban capital. He tok the original recipe and invented the “frappé daiquiri”, a “Below Zero” version of the first daiquiri, using loads of ice and also adding a few drops of marraschino, a very delicate, sweet and scented liqueur. Then he gave it the magical touch: he just poured everything into a blender and the mix came out looking like a snowflake.

Maraschino liqueur is used in various cocktails, among which includes the morello aviation cocktail, a cherry-flavoured delight. It is a perfect, yet subtle, complement to many tipples. And garnishing it with a maraschino cherry is the finishing touch!

To begin with, it was known as the “Wild Daiquiri” or the “Original”. Over the decades, it has been modified so many times there is practically a different recipe and fruit in every summer resort around the world. The story of the drink, however, remains the same, as does the original mix of one of my favourite cocktails.

Needed:

  • 3cl white rum
  • 1 spoonful of sugar
  • Half a squeezed lemon
  • Plenty of grinded ice
  • A drop of maraschino liqueur

How to make it:

1. Place all the ingredients in a blender and shake for at least 30 seconds.
2. Garnish with a lemon or lime wedge with a maraschino cherry.

Time: 3 minutes
Makes: 1 cocktail

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21Jun 12

The martini, a glamourous escape from reality

MartiniA couple of weeks ago, I was in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on a business trip. The company I was consulting for put me up at the Faena Hotel in a very fancy part of town, Puerto Madero. It’s actually a bit like the Lower East side of Manhattan, but with a Latin touch. On the Friday after my arrival, I wandered into the hotel’s bar, the Faena Cabaret, for a drink. The whole place looked like it was a set for the new James Bond saga, so I decided to order a cocktail fit for the occasion: a martini.

Even if the Martini became a worldwide classic with James Bond’s immortal phrase “shaken not stirred”, many other famous and powerful people have favoured this rather simple mix over the last hundred years. Winston Churchill, Ernest Hemingway and Truman Capote, amongst others, have added to the lore of this cocktail which is linked to status, fame and glory. There is something about just ordering it which transports one to a better place, where dreams and real life collide, if only for a while.

The exact origin of the martini is unclear. One theory suggests it comes from a cocktail called a Martinez, which was first served at the Occidental Hotel in San Francisco in 1862. According to the myth, people used to gather in this bar before taking the evening ferry to the nearby town of Martinez. Another story claims it is named after a famous bartender who first concocted the drink at the Knickerbockers Hotel in New York City, in 1913.

A martini is made by mixing gin and dry vermouth, which is a fortified white wine, infused, distilled or macerated with herbs, spices, caramel and other ingredients. A quality martini should taste very clean and dry, go down smooth, and have some light herbal flavors (from the gin) and a little bit of tang (from the olives and vermouth).

Needed:

  • 3cl gin
  • 1.5cl dry vermouth
  • A couple of olives or lemon twist

How it’s made:
1.Pour the ingredients into a mixing glass filled with ice.
2.Shake or stir for half a minute.
3.Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.
4.Garnish with an olive or lemon twist.

Time: 3 minutes
Makes: 1 cocktail

Note: As you probably know, this is the classic martini, but there are an endless number of varieties. One such example is this Green Cowboy Martini. Not quite the original, but an interesting twist!

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24Apr 12

Hot Toddy

Hot toddyA few years ago, I decided to join some friends who were working as ski instructors in Austria for a couple of weeks. I was actually on my way back from somewhere hot and wasn’t ready for the cold that hit me when I arrived in Lech. In order to warm myself up, I ran into a bar downtown and ordered a Hot Toddy. Luckily, the bartender was from Bolton and understood my request. He gave me a big smile and said, “There is nothing in the world that compares to a good Hot Toddy on a lousy day, is there lad?”

The Hot Toddy is usually known as a winter beverage made from a distilled spirit (whiskey or brandy preferably), sugar and water. It is believed to be very good for people who have the flu or are feeling under the weather. When I was growing up, sometimes my Dad would tell my Mum that he was not feeling very well. Her reply was always,“Shall I make you a Hot Toddy then, Love?”

As to where the name of the drink comes from, it has been suggested that the name comes from the Toddy drink in India produced by fermenting the sap of Palm trees. The term could have been introduced into Scotland by a member of the British East India Company. Another version says it is believed to have originated in 18th century Scotland as a mixed drink to make Scotch drinks more palatable to women. (This pink scotch drink may be pink, but it is delectable for men and women alike!)

Regardless of where it comes from, when I feel cold and somewhat miserable, a nice Hot Toddy always cheers me up.

Needed:

  • 3 cl of brandy, whiskey or rum
  • 1 teaspoon of honey
  • 1/4 lemon
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 1 tea bag of your favorite tea
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 star anise

How my Mum used to make it:

  1. Coat the bottom of a mug with the honey.
  2. Add the liquor.
  3. Squeeze in the juice from the lemon.
  4. Heat the cup of water and add the tea bag to make hot tea.
  5. Pour the hot tea into the mug and stir.
  6. Garnish with the cinnamon sticks and anise.

If you’re not a tea drinker, you can substitute coffee or simply add only the hot water.

Time: between 3 and 5 minutes
Makes: 1 tea size mug

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